Influential Reads – November 2019

Good production in November on both fronts.

Updated stats through November:

Saved ArticlesBooks
JanuaryN/A2
February901
March390
April630
May393
June630
July790
August881
September513
October890
November1052
Total70612

Here are my most influential reads – in no particular order:

  1. Tech’s Pioneers Have Been Left Behind. Their Stocks Are Cheap—and Complicated – “Legacy tech has stopped growing, and there are no easy fixes”.
  2. Bernstein Says Stop When You Win The Game – “When you’ve won the game, why keep playing it?”.
  3. Time Machines & Species Failure – “These firms pulled a Robin Hood on the greatest thieves of time in post-WWII America — ad-supported media”.
  4. First Principles: The Building Blocks of True Knowledge – “We’re all somewhere on the spectrum between coach and play stealer. We reason by first principles, by analogy, or a blend of the two.”
  5. From Chaos to Concept – “Life hacks make for good 90 second viral Internet videos but the minutiae will never help you get ahead in life.”
  6. Reflexivity Here In The Yield Curve & Everywhere – “In practice, momentum strategies buy winners and sells losers. Thus, it can create a self-reinforcing loop. … In fact, the same can be said for market-cap-weighted passive investment strategies.”
  7. What’s your big domino? – “we confuse effectiveness over efficiency; and we schedule more meetings to avoid making important decisions.”
  8. Millennials Should Be Happy They Are Stuck Renting – “Most of the rise in single-family house prices over time is due to larger new structures with more marble bathrooms, fancier kitchens, etc. “
  9. How to Prepare Yourself to Be a Great CEO – “The best way to do this is to join the management team of the best start-up that will have you.”
  10. The Obvious Way to Improve Your Career – “Knowing how to draw a detailed and accurate map of your career is the first step. The second is knowing how to navigate it. How to cultivate the skills, assets and signals that will move you forward in the direction you want to proceed.”

Note: This is based on when I read the article, not necessarily when it was first published.  Unfortunately, my backlog of things I would like to read always seems to dwarf the amount of time I can devote to reading.

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